Archive for the ‘You Must Be Hungry’ Category

‘Let My Children Cook’

April 10, 2014

This piece was first published on The Jew and the Carrot blog at the Forward.

Let-My-Children-Cook-cover-layoutDon’t worry if you are too tired to cook again after the seders this Passover. Thanks to a new cookbook by Tamar Ansh, you can let the kids take over the kitchen for the rest of the weeklong holiday. They won’t necessarily prepare fancy dishes made with organic and locally sourced ingredients, but with the guidance of “Let My Children Cook!,” they’ll be able to put together some substantial meals that they — and maybe you too — will want to eat.

“As a mother, I know what kids like to eat,” Ansh, cooking instructor and author of several cookbooks, including “A Taste of Challah,” told the Jew and the Carrot from her home in Jerusalem. “It doesn’t have to be a full-blown recipe. Chicken cacciatore braised in wine sauce is not for kids.” Although she had never written a cookbook for kids before, she knew she had to keep the recipes clear and short, with as few ingredients and steps as possible.

Officially, “Let My Children Cook!” (Judaica Press, 2014) is for children 8-years-old and up, but kids even younger can easily tackle these recipes with the help of a parent or older sibling.
Click here to read more.

© 2014 Renee Ghert-Zand. All rights reserved.

Watching the Rise and Fall and Rise Again of Butchering

March 6, 2014

This piece first appeared as “What to Watch at San Francisco’s Jewish Film Fest” on The Jew and the Carrot blog at the Forward.

Fleisher's training pc

If you’re very squeamish, or if you believe that Jews should eat only kosher food, then the film “Meat Hooked!” is not for you. Otherwise, you’ll find it an interesting cinematic study on the renaissance of the art of (non-kosher) butchering.

Filmgoers will have a chance to catch a screening of the 2012 documentary as part of a food-focused film marathon at the Jewish Community Center of San Francisco on March 9. The other films to be shown are Trever Graham’s “Make Hummus Not War” and Ari A. Cohen’s “Falafel! Give Peas a Chance.”

Of late, there has been plenty of talk about organic and sustainable farming, pasture-raised cattle, and nose-to-tail restaurant cooking, but few of us actually watch how an animal gets from the field to the plate. “Meat Hooked!” provides more than just a passing glance at the process. It ain’t a pretty sight, but it’s eye-opening in many ways — not only for what we learn about how a carcass is carved up, but also about what drives certain people to want to wield a cleaver day in and day out.

“This is a film about meat. And about the rise and fall and rise again of butchers and butchering,” says director Suzanne Wasserman in the voiceover for the introduction to the film. Wasserman is director of the Gotham Center for New York City History and an expert on the history of Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

Click here to read more and watch the trailer.

© 2014 Renee Ghert-Zand. All rights reserved.

Jews ‘Deserve’ a Better Cheddar

March 5, 2014

This piece was first published in The Times of Israel.

Mark Bodzin appreciates good cheese. (photo credit: Jim Huryk/Courtesy of Mark Bodzin)

Mark Bodzin appreciates good cheese. (photo credit: Jim Huryk/Courtesy of Mark Bodzin)

Mark Bodzin is hoping that many of his fellow kosher foodies will say, “Cheese, please,” and support his efforts to bring high-end kosher cheddar to the market. He has launched a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign to support a 600-pound run of the stuff, and he’s more than half way to his target with less than three weeks to go.

Bodzin, who has long appreciated good food and wine, and who has kept kosher for most of his life, is trying to do his part to improve the kosher offerings out there.

“I’ve always been amazed that there is not more of a supply of high-end kosher food,” he told The Times of Israel.

Click here to read more.

© 2014 Renee Ghert-Zand. All rights reserved.


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