‘Survival in Sarajevo’ Focuses a Lens on Wartime Friendship

This article was originally published in The Times of Israel.

Haris Karalic, a Bosnian Muslim, bidding goodbye to his 13-year-old son Denis, who is leaving Sarajevo on a JDC rescue convoy, February 1994. (photo credit: Edward Serotta)

Haris Karalic, a Bosnian Muslim, bidding goodbye to his 13-year-old son Denis, who is leaving Sarajevo on a JDC rescue convoy, February 1994. (photo credit: Edward Serotta)

SAN FRANCISCO — Edward Serotta believes photographs he took 20 years ago during the Siege of Sarajevo are even more powerful today than when he first captured them. In a world in which sectarian violence continues to rage, the images he captured of Jews, Bosniak Muslims, Croatian Catholics and Orthodox Serbs helping one another survive in their sieged city continue to resonate

Serotta’s photographs were originally published in a 1994 book titled, “Survival in Sarajevo: Jews, Bosnia, and the Lessons of the Past.” Now, two decades after the Bosnian War, some of them are featured in a traveling exhibit (also titled “Survival in Sarajevo”), which is currently on display at the main branch of the San Francisco Public Library until March 16.

The exhibition was produced by Centropa, a Vienna-based educational non-profit organization the American Serotta founded in 2000 to document the oral histories and family photographs of elderly Jews living in Central and Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, and the Sephardic communities of Greece, Turkey and the Balkans.

Click here to read more.

© 2014 Renee Ghert-Zand. All rights reserved.

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