Posts Tagged ‘Odessa’

Philadelphia Honors Grande Dame of Piano

May 10, 2013

This piece was first published on The Arty Semite blog at the Forward.

Nelly Berman with her then-2-year-old daughter at the piano.

Nelly Berman with her then-2-year-old daughter at the piano.

Philadelphia’s classical music-loving community is coming together on May 11 at Centennial Hall in Haverford, Pennsylvania to pay tribute to the achievements of Nelly Berman, a Russian-Jewish immigrant who has touched the lives of hundreds of young music students over the past 30 years.

Jonathan Adler, who has been studying piano at the Nelly Berman School of Music for a decade, describes its formidable director as a drill sergeant and loving grandmother rolled into one. Off to Yale in the fall, where he hopes to continue studying music, Adler told The Arty Semite, “NBS has taught me the importance not only of learning and loving classical music, but of performing the music as well.”

Berman’s daughter, Elena Berman Gantard and others in the school’s community have organized a gala concert, in which 24 pianists will play 24 preludes by Chopin and more than 30 other students will showcase their skills on violin, viola, cello, flute, clarinet, trumpet, voice and chamber music. The elder Berman, 74 and suffering from ill health, is making the trip to Philadelphia from Florida to be at the celebration.

Click here to read more.

© 2013 Renee Ghert-Zand. All rights reserved.

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For Jewish Brighton Beach, It’s Memoir Time

June 12, 2012

This piece was first published in The Times of Israel.

If you’ve seen movies set in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn such as “Little Odessa” and “Two Lovers”, you would think that the neighborhood is inhabited almost exclusively by Jews from the Former Soviet Union.

If today were the 1990s, you’d be right. But a group of Columbia University graduate students has produced a short video, called “The Changing Face of Brighton Beach,” documenting how the population of Brighton Beach has changed dramatically in the past couple of decades. Hint: You’ll still hear a whole lot of Russian in the streets, but you can’t assume its speakers are Jewish.

Click here to read more and watch the video.
© 2012 Renee Ghert-Zand. All rights reserved.